18 comments on “Romney’s Inside Man

  1. “I know the Democrat talking points have been that it’s all in the past, that Hillary was pacified with a nice Secretary of State position designed to give her foreign policy credentials and that all’s been forgiven, but allow me to make the case that Bill’s “gaffes” are not accidental.”

    I think you’re misreading this supposed rift in the Clinton and Obama camps. I think its more about the Clintons not wanting to ruffle the money-green feathers of past, and possibly future, campaign donors, if Hillary chooses to make a run for the White House in 2016.

    “I believe that Bill has concluded that if President Obama wins a second term, he will suffer through a lackluster economy burdened by growing debt and an increasingly frustrated populous.”

    Call me naive, but I don’t think that Bill is so Machiavellian as to want to see Obama defeated. The economy could rebound in the next four years, and that, too, would constitute a shoo-in for Hillary if she chooses to run.

    “If he gets another term and fails, as Jennifer Granholm did in Michigan in her second term with the same economic policies, his legacy will be far harder to protect.”

    You sound a great deal like that new Republican ad, aimed at blacks and white, guilt-laden Democrats, which says essentially: “It’s okay to make a change. Obama’s done his best.”

    I don’t care about “Obama’s legacy,” no more than I care about a “black legacy.” When are blacks going to stop worrying about how whites perceive us? I don’t give a damn about whites’ perception of President Obama, nor of their percetpions of blacks specifically, or generally.

    “If he completes only one term without the assassination many of you predicted, racial healing and a future black president would be far more likely.”

    Hold your nose black Democrats, and vote for a Republican, or not at all, and you may live to see a black man or woman in the White House another day, as the reelection of President Obama may just sour whites to such a degree that they’ll never consider a black person again.

    If “racial healing,” and the future of a black winning the White House again, fall to blacks not voting Democrat this time, to hell with it: I, and I hope no other black, will take on the burden of fostering “racial healing” and “keeping hope alive,” by voting Republican, or not voting at all.

    I’m not the one that need “racial healing,” and I won’t be the one to take the medicine to cure another’s ailment.

    “The situation for our economy is not very bright and there is a slight chance of it collapsing, I think you should ask yourself: do you really want this hung around the neck of President Obama?”

    And you should “ask yourself”: What makes you think a flatlining ecnomy will be “hung around the neck of President Obama,” and not an obstructionist Republican party–and, even if there is “a slight chance of [the economy] collapsing,” why should we roll up into a prenatal position, suck our thumb, and do nothing to reelect the man who hold our confidence, rather than come out swinging.

    “While Romney may not be any of your choice for president, I think it may do you some good to consider…could Bill Clinton be right?”

    You sound a great deal like Dre’s “inside man,” and an accommodationist to boot. Blacks should stay true to their vision of who they are, and who they hope to be, rather than capitulate to some future that may never come about.

    And further: There’s nothing that would entice me to vote for a Republican. Republicans have attacked the first black president with a racist and racial fury that would make Strom Thurmond proud; have attacked women’s reproductive rights; and have used voter suppression laws to assure victory in the upcoming presidential race.

    The only “good” that would come from “consider[ing” Willard Mitt Romney for president, is that he would make such an utter mess of it–destroying the country in the process–that it would spell the end of the Republican party.

    And that would be “good” thing!

    • Hey Black Diaspora,
      I hope nobody here thought that I expected rousing support for this post. In fact, I’m getting exactly what I assumed I’d get. Denial. Denial that things may not look good for Barack, denial that people within his own party may not be supporting him….the same way some people in the RNC aren’t supporting Mitt wholeheartedly, denial that the economy isn’t going well and President Obama may get the blame. I understand that most of you only hear one side of the argument and that going to Fox news is the equivalant of attending a KKK rally. So that’s why I’m here. I think, B.D., that you have done a great job of outlining the other side of my argument, which you always do. However, your pretty much parroting the MSM line that everything is fine and we have no worries and even if we do, it’s the fault of Republicans who only control slightly better than 1/2 of 1/3 of the power. It may be true that you “don’t give a damn about whites’ perception of President Obama, nor of their percetpions of blacks specifically, or generally.” but politically, no politician gets elected by “not giving a damn” about a group whethers it’s gays, blacks, women, or yes…. even white men. Thanks again though, for making the your case articulately and with civility. I’m always trying to learn from you as I hope your seeing another side through me.

      • “Denial that things may not look good for Barack.”

        I denied no such thing. Right now, things are dicey at best. But then, things aren’t looking all that sanguine for Willard Romney.

        “denial that people within his own party may not be supporting him….”

        I denied no such thing. I said: I don’t believe that Bill and Hillary would purposely sabotage President Obama’s bid for reelection, for political gain, because such a move–unless it can be done without detection–would further erode Bill’s image in the black community, which his recent support for the president has repaired a bit.

        “the same way some people in the RNC aren’t supporting Mitt wholeheartedly”

        They don’t support him, because you can’t support what you don’t know: Williard Mitt Romney has taken both sides of every issue that has faced the American people, or is facing the American people.

        He’s only released one year of his tax returns and a summary of another, using the excuse that releasing the returns will do more harm (the other side will use them to attack him) than good.

        He’s out of touch. How do you criticize cookies, insult a woman in her business establishment, a whole nation–and can’t tell a donut from a donut hole.

        He’s surrounded himself with G.W. Bush’s neo-cons, and hawkish advisers, and has turned to Cheney, a Halliburton, war-profiteer, a company that stands to make even more American billions in the event of a war with Iran.

        “denial that the economy isn’t going well and President Obama may get the blame.”

        I denied no such thing, although the economy isn’t in a recession, the employment situation not as good as it could be–since out-sourcing of American jobs, and offshoring have taken their toll–and the disparity between the rich and the middle class is a yawning chasm.

        And it’s possible that the president might get the blame–many are blaming him now–but that doesn’t mean that he deserves the blame, and that all Americans will place this bad economy at his feet.

        “However, your pretty much parroting the MSM line that everything is fine and we have no worries and even if we do, it’s the fault of Republicans who only control slightly better than 1/2 of 1/3 of the power.”

        I never said “everything is fine and we have no worries.” And yes, I hold Republicans responsible for flatlining the economy, and failing to resuscitate it by placing it on life support, doing what the government has done in times gone by to bring us out of recessions.

        This time around, Republicans are more interested in defeating President Obama by extending a sick economy, than using the resuscitative means at their disposal. Without a filibuster-proof number in the Senate, and control of the House, Democrats, and the president are helpless sideliners, wanting to be in the game, but lacking the numbers to do so.

        “It may be true that you “don’t give a damn about whites’ perception of President Obama, nor of their percetpions of blacks specifically, or generally.” but politically, no politician gets elected by “not giving a damn” about a group whethers it’s gays, blacks, women, or yes…even white men.”

        I didn’t say that.

        I said that I don’t give a damn about “white perception.” And I don’t. I only care about how I perceive me. I didn’t say that I don’t give a damn about “a group.”

        You said that.

        “I’m always trying to learn from you as I hope your seeing another side through me.”

        Indeed, I am.

      • Hi B.D.,
        If you would please re-read my comments on denial at this site, you’d see that I was referring to the larger view here… not quoting you. I stand behind my comment that you are “parroting the MSM line that everything is fine and we have no worries and even if we do, it’s the fault of Republicans.” You even said, “And yes, I hold Republicans responsibl
        e for flatlining the economy.” Since Obama enjoyed absolute control of both houses (something the Republicans have only had twice in 70 years) and still enjoys the majority of power, it’s hard to see how you can blame the Republicans for this God-awful non-recovery. However, the Liberal creed, which you seem to be following, is always that our plans would have worked if 1)It was done broader. 2)We spent even more money. or 3) There was no opposition. Are you saying that Obama can only succeed if he is given absolute power and unlimited funds as a autocratic dictator? On the quote by you on perception, it’s hard to see how you do not care how a group perceives you and at the same time assert that you are in any way sympathetic to their issues. It sounds like your saying “I do what I think is right and who cares what others think about it.” It’s hard to see how you can learn anything about other people’s feelings and concerns with that attitude. I’m not sure what you mean by “Indeed, I am.” Could you clarify for me?

      • “I do what I think is right and who cares what others think about it.”

        There, you have it!

        “It’s hard to see how you can learn anything about other people’s feelings and concerns with that attitude.”

        There’s nothing wrong with the “attitude” except in your own mind, and your eagerness to pin me to the canvass on this point.

        Once I’ve calculated, using my value system, and my hard-won truth over many years, I act, from that place of being, and not from yours.

        I don’t consult opinion polls, or Fox News, or any other news outlet, or any supposed expert.

        If you live your life seeking to satisfy other people’s values, other people’s truths, rather than your own, then you have merely lived by proxy, and wasted an invaluable opportunity to create and recreate who you are, and who you wish to be.

      • Hi B.D.,
        Well, I’m certainly not going to try to change your life philosophy. I would caution you, however, on basing your morality on your own value system with disregard for larger societal morality built around other peoples concerns. Self-suscribed morality ALWAYS favors the self.

      • “Self-suscribed morality ALWAYS favors the self.”

        And who else should it favor?

        “To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.” Shakespeare

  2. I don’t agree with this post at all. The Clintons may be cunning, but I doubt they’d sabotage Obama’s presidency at this point. They had their chance in 2008. But now they’re falling in line with everybody else. They may not like it, but they’re not above the party.

    • Right on, Danielle. If Hillary run in 2016, she’ll need the black vote to the same degree as President Obama. Why, then, alienate a large segment of that voting demographic by “sabotag[ing] Obama’s presidency”?

      Blacks may not be elephants (certainly not Republican elephants), but they have memories like one. Any shenanigans from the Clintons would all but assure Hillary’s defeat in 2016, is she decides to run.

    • @Danielle and B.D.,
      The Clintons are certainly not going to publicly and openly attack Barack. It’s going to be “Oops, sorry, everyone just forget what I just said.” Which they won’t. I’m suprised that all of you have such faith in the Clintons who even Andre just said, “ran a campaign immersed in race-baiting and underhanded hustling”.

      • “I’m suprised that all of you have such faith in the Clintons who even Andre just said, ‘ran a campaign immersed in race-baiting and underhanded hustling’”.

        I didn’t say that I have “faith” that the Clintons would do the right thing, but that they would do the politically-expedient thing, since to do otherwise would be political suicide, and incur the wrath of blacks 10 generations deep.

      • Hey B.D.,
        You said about the Clintons, “they would do the politically-expedient thing, since to do otherwise would be political suicide, and incur the wrath of blacks 10 generations deep.”

        Political suicide?? Are you trying to tell me black people would vote Republican? Just stay home? Black people vote Democrat monolithically at 90%+, that’s simply a fact. All it takes is the threat of Social cuts or accusations of racism and they’ll scurry like Pavlov’s dog to the polls. Black people in West Virginia voted 80%+ for Robert Byrd an ex-KKK Kleagle. In general, I think it’s fair to say blacks never hold Democrats responsible for racist acts..they make excuses for them.

      • “All it takes is the threat of Social cuts or accusations of racism and they’ll scurry like Pavlov’s dog to the polls.”

        Do you have any idea how racially insensitive this remark is? You’re not going to engage too many blacks here or elsewhere by tossing out stereotypes like the one above.

        I don’t know hc: Do you give any thought to your positions, and how you express them?

      • Hey B.D.,
        “Do you have any idea how racially insensitive this remark is?”
        Yes. I stared long and hard at that statement before I decided to push “enter”. I feel everyone here is very honest with me, it’s the reason I come here.I feel your very honest with me and it’s the reason I engage you-to learn someone else’s view. I would think everyone would want the same from me, I already know my views and how I came to them, understanding yours is way more important to me to reach a greater understanding of things like black people voting the way they do. I’m speaking truth, not some white, guilt-laden B.S. designed to make you like me. I’m fascinated with black voting habits and what I perceive as the Democrat attempt to keep you from listening to the other side by using race. That really doesn’t happen with anyone else. I believe that black people are no different from anyone else and should be allowed to form their own opinions based on all the available information the way Asians or Middle Easterners do. You should not be kept in a permanant lower class by believing that dependence on Government is the only answer and anyone who thinks otherwise is a racist. If I offended anyone, I apologize, but I don’t do it to be mean or racist, I do it because I honestly believe black people are manipulated in a way that is indeed racist by people who aren’t looking out for your best interest and are looking for your vote no matter the cost to you, your family, or your culture. Do Republicans have all the answers? No. But you do deserve options like everyone else. I’m leaving for a vacation without a internet connection, so I’ll let you have the last word. Again, thanks for the debate, your always pushing my thinking on issues and I appreciate it even when we disagree. Have a great weekend!

      • “I do it because I honestly believe black people are manipulated in a way that is indeed racist by people who aren’t looking out for your best interest and are looking for your vote no matter the cost to you, your family, or your culture.”

        I guess we don’t see the threat that you see.

        And, too, your stated motive is paternalistic, and therefore demeaning, as it suggests that blacks don’t know what constitute their best interest, but must be informed by you, or others like you, supposedly those who’re well-meaning and more insightful.

        Blacks aren’t children!

        We can make up our minds for ourselves, and without the help of misguided whites who believe that we’ve been snookered by cunning whites, be they liberal or what have you.

        I’m sure that you can’t see how offensive that mindset is, and what it says about our ability to tell friend from foe.

        “Do Republicans have all the answers? No. But you do deserve options like everyone else.”

        Yes, we deserve “options,” but they won’t be forthcoming from Republicans, whose attitude says: “Take it or leave it,” and “What you see is what you get.”

        As a black I don’t like what I see: voter suppression laws in Republican-run statehouses that target blacks, the elderly and students; attacks on President Obama’s right to serve as Commander in Chief, questioning his place of birth, although ample evidence has been produced that he’s an American citizen with all the rights appertaining thereto; attacks on women reproductive rights; threats to repeal the Affordable Healthcare law that regulates the healthcare industry, no more and no less than the government regulates other industries; Republicans very early stated aspirations to make President Obama a one-term president; Republican support for DOMA and their opposition to repealing “don’t ask, don’t tell.”

        I could go on.

        “You should not be kept in a permanant lower class by believing that dependence on Government is the only answer and anyone who thinks otherwise is a racist.”

        You really should spend a lifetime as a black person to see just how inaccurate that statement is.

        Government isn’t the problem: It’s a society that has spent years–decades–keeping blacks down, keeping blacks from fully participating in the society that they–as slaves–helped build.

        For years, this nation has sought to compete internationally with one arm tied behind its back, by not offering blacks the opportunities that whites took for granted–a good education from top to bottom–and jobs commensurate to our talent and the education that we did manage to receive.

        As for dependence on the government, I know many blacks who have never taken government assistance of any kind, and who, despite efforts to keep them down, have risen high above the expectations of those who believed that blacks should stay in their place.

        In truth, this nation has a fairly large white underclass who are no stranger to poverty or government assistance, but no one ever speaks of them, or their plight.

        “I believe that black people are no different from anyone else and should be allowed to form their own opinions based on all the available information the way Asians or Middle Easterners do.”

        Your assumption lacks merit, and is, frankly, insulting. If we’re “no different from anyone else,” then we have access to the information we need to inform our decisions, and choices.

        Because we generally vote en masse for Democrats is not an indication that we are ill-informed, or lack access to all the information and facts we need to inform our actions.

        Most racist and racial commentary come from the Right and not the Left–such talk as blacks being on a liberal “plantation,” and that we’re still “slaves” to the Democratic Party.

        Let me assure you: That kind of talk is no way to “win friends and influence people.”

        “I already know my views and how I came to them, understanding yours is way more important to me to reach a greater understanding of things like black people voting the way they do.”

        The problem with that statement is that you already think that you know, and are informing us of why we do what we do: “I honestly believe black people are manipulated in a way that is indeed racist by people who aren’t looking out for your best interest and are looking for your vote no matter the cost to you, your family, or your culture.”

        You have to come from a place of “not knowing” before you can honestly know what we know, and why we do what we do. But that’s not possible from a place of presuppositions and a priori thinking.

        “I feel your very honest with me and it’s the reason I engage you-to learn someone else’s view.”

        It’s one think to “learn someone else’s view,” and it’s another to understand “someone else’s view.” It’s not the same thing.

        For starters, no two blacks vote the way they do for the same reason. We aren’t monoliths, not in the way we live, what we value, and how we vote.

        There’s much more diversity among us than you’d believe at first blush. I have a brother-in-law, for example, who would make Archie Bunker blush–he’s that right-wing.

        Rather than lump all blacks together in one large political cauldron, take the time to “really” understand why we vote the way we do.

        For example: You’d be amazed why I vote Democrat, and it has nothing to do with race, or racism, or that Democrats may offer me some kind of “goodie” for voting Democrat.

        I have no need of government largess, and have never partaken of government assistance or government aid.

        Never!

  3. Hip Con, if there is one thing Bill Clinton loves more than anything, it’s himself. HIS legacy. After he and Hill ran a campaign immersed in race-baiting and underhanded hustling, their image and legacy took a major hit; a hit that could’ve damaged them forever (I mean, you saw how many black folks walked away from them after that South Carolina nonsense). Hill learned her lesson by not trying to kick up dust at the national convention, defying the expectation of millions of PUMAs, to eventually take a job working for Obama. Slick Willy toned down his rhetoric and supported (albeit, begrudgingly) Obama’s efforts. They slid into place.

    Fast forward to today.

    While it’s true, Slick Willy had some pretty kind words to share about Willard’s business acumen, he eventually backtracked on his tacit suggestion of Romney’s skill. You can make the argument that Bill is trying to sabotage things. But I think he’s far more concerned about how history will remember him than he is about his wife’s future as president. A future which, by the way, might not even exist.

  4. Hey Dre,
    I think your making good points along with others, but what I don’t think your seeing is the desperation that Hillary feels with the clock ticking away after she was so sure in 2008 that her place in history was secure. Another point that needs to be made; after 2008, the DNC moved to dismantle the Clintons beloved DLC. That means the progressives now have near full control and the moderates are being pushed to the side. The historical records of the DLC have been purchased by the Clinton Foundation. Fond memories of how things could have been before Barack? A lost chance to be the first women president? An overthrow of power? But no animosity? I’m not sure I’m buying it.

  5. @Everyone,
    Out of curiousity, how many people here even knew the DLC existed or what roll it played? I just want to know if I did anything positive here.

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