15 comments on “Vetting the VEEP

  1. Obama made the best political choice that he could in Biden. It doesn’t really matter matter to Obama’s supporters / followers who he picks as VP – as long as it isn’t Hillary. Biden’s opposing views won’t effect their support one iota.

    On the other hand, Biden bring both Washington Insider experience and a more hawkish foreign policy and domestic security stance to Obama’s campaign which may be very useful for pulling in some of the less rabid PUMAS and the independents.

    Yeah, choosing an 30 year veteran “old white guy” as his VP kind of mangles Obama’s “Change” mantra, but that won’t be noticed that much by his faithful and will be noticed by the swing voters.

  2. @ Jonolan: Hi there. Welcome to the discussion.

    It doesn’t really matter matter to Obama’s supporters / followers who he picks as VP – as long as it isn’t Hillary

    The problem is – as I’ve always stated – that many Dem supporters are fervently for Clinton. If John McCain can get 15-20% of Hill voters to either cast their vote somewhere else (not even necessarily him) or not cast it at all, he will win this election. The “Debra” ad will play from now until November and will most assuredly impact people’s decisions/compound their frustration about Hillary being left out. This was a bad move politically for Obama. I wish I shared your same trust in the “less rabid” PUMAs and indepedents. But voter habits are fickle and easily swayed.

    “Yeah, choosing an 30 year veteran “old white guy” as his VP kind of mangles Obama’s “Change” mantra, but that won’t be noticed that much by his faithful and will be noticed by the swing voters.”

    Trust me: the pundits won’t stop driving this point home until long after the election.

    Thanks for your comments!

  3. Those PUMAS I mentioned would NOT be the ones not in the 15-20% that you’re concerned about. My best guess is that Obama will fail to get their support at this point. I think he can pretty much give up on the para- and post-menopausal White female vote since he beat their candidate and then didn’t concede to her or her husband.

    Perhaps Obama can get enough of the rest of them and enough independents to win the election. Even if he does get them though, I’m guessing he’ll end up elected with a less than 5% majority in the popular vote.

  4. Are you sure you’re not working on the McCain campaign? You’re doing a lot to get him elected.

  5. Love him or hate him, McCain’s campaign is getting the job done with the attack ads. If his ads are able to plant seeds of doubt in Obama supporters, imagine how successful they will be in rallying the base and getting the independent vote.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats are proving that they love to inflict pain on themselves. Obama/Biden? Uh oh…

  6. Dre, as you know I’m not the biggest of fan of Joe Biden. I’m not a fan of how he basically signed the permission slip that Bush needed to go to war in the first place. Even when he (and Clinton) expressed their “regret” in authorizing Bush to wage war, they still allowed it to happen. I don’t dislike him as much as I do Hillary for her more deliberate racebaiting (I don’t think that Biden’s “articulate” comment) was as racially charged as some of the mess Hillary and her surrogates said).

    Obama could’ve did a whole lot better with his choice. But he could’ve also did worse.

  7. Hi Andre,

    As you know, I usually don’t following politics that much. I like to stay aware of the things impacting my life and life of those around me, but I’m not as spiritedly for or against something. But I will at least say that I was a Hillary supporter. As such, I am completely baffled by this decision. Biden received less than 1% of all the voters in the primary while Hillary received close to 48% and did get so much as a nod as a potential vice president. Something doesn’t add up.

  8. I cannot imagine a real democrat refusing to support Barack Obama because they are in a tiff over Hillary Clinton not winning the nomination. Everyone, but the true “diehard conservatives” ought to be able to realize that four more years of John McCain is going to amount to a third Bush term. McCain supports the war in Iraq, supports an angry, interventionist foreign policy, supports more tax breaks and giveaways for the weathly in this country, and has no interest in making this economy more liveable for ordinary working folks. Please think about all of that carefully.

    Barack Obama wants a timetable withdrawal from Iraq, a foreign policy that takes that will restore America’s good name and reputation, will end tax giveaways for the wealthy, and will work to restore some balance in this economy. These are all policies that Hillary Clinton supported too.

    The only possible reason a Clinton supporter could have for not supporting Obama is spite and jealousy. Barack has now shown that someone other than a white male can win the Presidency in this country. That alone is a huge achievement that will open the door in the future for women and other minorities. Defeating Obama will only convince democrats not to take such a chance in the future. It may slam the door in terms of picking a woman or a minority as the standard bearer again.

    Please, it’s time for people to get over their jealousy and do the right thing. Obama needs and deserves our support. If he wins this election, the doorway will be open to nominating women and minorities in the future as well.

  9. If Hillary’s name is not on the ballot, I’m not voting. It’s as simple as that. Spare me all the sob stories about Obama.

  10. Kenya,

    Many of these PUMAS aren’t so much supporting Clinton as they are attacking Obama, who they see as the Democratic Party leaders’ appointed nominee. They’re angry at their party’s behavior in the primary more than supportive of Clinton.

  11. Since you apparently aren’t answering your phone, HAPPY BIRTHDAY Dre!

    29?! Daaaang!

  12. Kenya, you’re spot-on.

    I’d also add that any Obama supporter who thought Barack was going to completely revamp American politics in one election and not have to play the game a lil’ bit is naive. The Biden decision is a reflection of Barack still having to play that crazy effin’ game, and if he has to put somebody in the VP slot that some of his base disagree w/ in order to achieve the things that actually matter, then so be it. What Obama does or does not do after he is elected President is what will prove him to be either a good, even great leader, or just another schmuck politician.

    -n

  13. @ Jonolan: “Even if he does get them though, I’m guessing he’ll end up elected with a less than 5% majority in the popular vote.

    I’m hoping that the pissed-off firebreathing Hillbots won’t play too much of a role in the election. But I’ve found quite a few websites devoted to people who make it their highest priority to keep Obama out of the White House. A +5% electorate is being generous.

    @ Anonymous: “Are you sure you’re not working on the McCain campaign? You’re doing a lot to get him elected.

    I’m just reporting things as I see them.

    @ MissKD: “Love him or hate him, McCain’s campaign is getting the job done with the attack ads. If his ads are able to plant seeds of doubt in Obama supporters, imagine how successful they will be in rallying the base and getting the independent vote.”

    I know, right? That “Debra” ad was a real beast for luring Hillspawn voters. Damn bringing guns to a gunfight. These jokers are bringing bazookas.That ad will be effective because McCain is at least giving the notion that he empathizes with Hilary supporters.

    @ Cyn/Kenya/Ellena: I can’t stand Hillspawn, but the woman did generate 18 million votes. Obama can accomplish the same feat as what McCain stands to do if he keeps acknowledging their role and giving Hillary a spot somewhere in cabinet (for most, it’s President or bust, but I think most of those rabid supporters would retract their claws for a VEEP slot). But going with Biden – who got less than 1% of votes during the primary – is not the way to appease things with 18 million people. Even having Hilary stand up and tell her supporters “It’s OK. Support Barack” won’t work; since they’ll feel she’s been forced to accept this.

    I talk a whole lot of junk about Hil and her supporters. But one thing Obama can’t afford to do right now is ignored them outright.

  14. @ Hillary 4 prez: You know what they say: If you’ve got nothing nice to say to a person, just say “No Comment”.

    On the real, for the life of me I can’t figure out what Obama has done to Hill’s supporters that have you all up in arms. If you’re upset about the backlash Hill received, that came mostly from Obama supporters; but even that was at a minimum. And for every sexist action that took place during the primaries (perpetrated mostly by loons on the right, I should add), there were just as many (probably more) racist attacks. Why the hostility toward Barack? For real?

    @ JJM: Thanks. Hater.

    @ Nic: “…any Obama supporter who thought Barack was going to completely revamp American politics in one election and not have to play the game a lil’ bit is naive.”

    Precisely my point. People are talking about how inspiring Obama is and how they embrace his change. I get that. But Obama’s inspiration and $3.29 can barely buy a latte at Starbucks. Elections are won by playing the occasional game of politics. People know that and they expect it. Make no mistake about it: I dig his platform. His speeches are among the best I’ve EVER heard. But speeches don’t equate to electability and legacy as a president; substance does. Good point, brotha!

  15. You may as well go ahead and throw your support to Biden. You really don’t have to know anything about him or his policies. He could be a schmuck through and through. His foreign policy may not be what you’re looking for in a Vice Prez. The problem with all of that is that we vote for the presidential candidate – we have no say-so in who’s VP, and are powerless to have someone else step in to take his place. Just call it an Obama/Biden ticket and be done with it.

    As for his remarks about Obama in the past, it was in the spirit of politics, campaigning as it were. I don’t like it. However, we are no longer individuals and enemies, we are a team that needs to win. Peace.

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