4 comments on “CNN’s Black in America; Day 2

  1. one point i’d like to make–even though i diidn’t watch it, it seems from what i’ve heard from the 1st segment of CNN and this one that the double standards of how men and women (be they Black or other) are viewed still apply–the single (sometimes teenaged)women with 99 children and baby-daddy drama (or maybe it was some of the comments i saw) vs the successful black man, even though he may have come from not-so-positive beginnings.

    i’m sure some women were depicted in a positive manner, but for the most part, it still seems like the black woman gets displayed as the underdog while the black man is focused on more positively. on the other hand, some black men may differ this point. but i know the whole CNN focus was on blacks as a whole.

    i still get the “i’m not black enough” comments from my skin color (been called high yellow) to the way i talk to my tastes in music, but what is not being black enough? do i need to sport a ‘fro or speak ebonics or walk around with my pants to my knees (do women dress this way?) to show i’m black enough? i don’t know what people are looking for, but black people are black and that’s that. perhaps that’s why there’s more interracial interactions these days. if you can’t fit in one place, you’ll certianly fit in another.

    and wasn’t John Brown hanged?

  2. Hi Sylv,

    The broadcast definitely focused on the stereotypical nature of black America; black folks who do nothing but bemoan their problems. But even when successful women were the focus, it was only within the context of them claiming an inability to find their equal within the circle of black men (a notion that, as I’ve said before, I strongly disagree with). In that respect, I feel the frustration that many black women on my blog and others in the blogosphere have with how they were generally being depicted.

    To your other point: “i still get the “i’m not black enough” comments from my skin color (been called high yellow) to the way i talk to my tastes in music, but what is not being black enough?

    That’s the $64,000 question. Perhaps I missed the memo at some point, but “blackness” stopped being about a color and became more about subscribing to a particular state of mind. That’s the sad reality with how we come to define ourselves and how other people define us. If I have Wilson Phillips playing in my iPod instead of Snoop Dog, I’ve suddenly lost my blackness like people lose their virginity. But I guarantee if a cop pulled me over right now, he could care less about what I was listening to. For him, what matters most is what I look like.

    perhaps that’s why there’s more interracial interactions these days. if you can’t fit in one place, you’ll certianly fit in another.

    For some, maybe. But I’m not sure if that’s always the case. I — for instance — always find myself in that perpetual conundrum. When my black family/friends hear me listening to Dave Matthews (who’s band, ironically is actually 60% black), my black o’ meter plummets. Meanwhile when my white friends/acquaintances see that race relations is one of my passions, I’m automatically labeled the second coming of Huey P. Newton. Keeping up with all the identities placed on me can get confusing.

    and wasn’t John Brown hanged?

    Yep; he was. I only threw the John Brown part in to steal a line from “Remember the Titans.” Probably not the best reference to have used in retrospect, though. 🙂

  3. Pingback: Too Much White in the Blackness « The Unmitigated Word

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